| WTF News |

9 days until the #911top50

Following up on yesterday’s countdown post, the section of the Pentagon that was hit was “renovated” to withstand attacks from explosions and projectiles.
Via LA Times

“American Airlines Flight 77 struck a portion of the building that had already been renovated. It was the only area of the Pentagon with a sprinkler system, and it had been reconstructed with a web of steel columns and bars to withstand bomb blasts. The steel reinforcement, bolted together to form a continuous structure through all of the Pentagon’s five floors, kept that section of the building from collapsing for 30 minutes–enough time for hundreds of people to crawl out to safety.

The area struck by the plane also had blast-resistant windows–2 inches thick and 2,500 pounds each–that stayed intact during the crash and fire. It had fire doors that opened automatically and newly built exits that allowed people to get out.”

“While perhaps 4,500 people normally would have been working in the hardest-hit areas, because of the renovation work only about 800 were there Tuesday, officials said.” – LA Times September 2001

Via 911research.wtc7.net

The fact that the attack targeted the one portion of the building that was mostly vacant is all the more remarkable considering the approach required by the aircraft blamed for the damage. According to the NTSB, American Airlines Flight 77 approached the capital from the West, and executed a 320-degree descending spiral, losing seven thousand feet before leveling out at nearly tree-top height as it made its final approach from the southwest. Instead of attacking the building in a direct fashion from a steep dive, the jet struck the first floor of the Pentagon’s west wall at a very low angle after impacting light poles and other structures hundreds of feet from the facade.” – 911research.wtc7.net

1M8JY68ALv116gdgEzLRP41VPUsNS5S4Bi

If you enjoy reading the information we bring you, please consider donating to WTF News via Bitcoin. Any donations are appreciated and go directly to expanding our capabilities.